Salt Spring Place Names

 

Introduction

 

The Aboriginal people had several names for Salt Spring Island.

The first written mention of Salt Spring Island appeared in a letter written by Governor James Douglas in 1853, a year after he explored the east coast of Vancouver Island by canoe. Douglas believed that his discovery of salt springs on the island “would be of the greatest importance and become a wealth to the country” (Douglas to Barclay, May 16, 1853, ms., Archives of BC). His report was published with a map of the area, on which Salt Spring is labelled Chuan. This name, which means “straight down to the sea,” had been given to Mt. Tuam on the south end of the island by the Cowichan. Over time, Chuan became Tuan and eventually Tuam, which it remains today. Meanwhile, the salt springs were sufficiently intriguing for Captain Walter Colquhoun Grant (in 1849 the first settler to purchase land on Vancouver Island) to label the island Saltspring Island on a map included in his 1856 “Description of Vancouver Island.”

Not to be outdone by Douglas, Captain George Henry Richards, who charted much of the northwest coast between 1857 and 1863, also attempted to impose a name on the island, renaming it Admiral Island in honour of Rear Admiral Robert Lambert Baynes, commander-in-chief of the Pacific station at Esquimalt between 1857 and 1860. Post-Richards maps referred to the island as Admiral Island and to Ganges Harbour as Admiralty Bay.

In the end, however, the salt springs captured the popular imagination, and the island became known locally as Salt Spring (two words) Island, in spite of Grant’s 1856 one-word spelling. Saltspring became the island’s official name when it was adopted by the Geographic Board of Canada in 1905, although Canada Post—with the support of many residents—still prefers it spelled as two words.

One can make a good case for the idea that the seeds of Salt Spring islanders’ contentious natures were planted with the debate over the island’s name. To this day, islanders fiercely argue about whether the name should be spelled as two words or one, with the Ministry of Highways taking the good Canadian middle ground by placing one sign reading “Salt Spring Way” on the west side of the Fulford-Ganges Road and another sign reading “Saltspring Way” on the east side of the road.

Names continue to plague the well-intentioned chronicler of Salt Spring history. Some problems are relatively minor—Walker Hook or Walker’s Hook, Maxwell Lake or Lake Maxwell. Others bring out the quarrelsomeness of those in the know. We’re told, for example, that Duck Bay is a corruption of Dock Bay and that Stowell Lake developed from Mr. Stowe’s name and the addition of two of the l’s that maps use to designate the word “lake”—Stowe L. became Stowel L., which then became Stowell L. Early references to Cusheon (both the lake and the road) used variant spellings such as Cushion or Cuicheon.

Salt Spring’s community names can also be confusing. For example, in the past, Vesuvius and Central were often used to refer to the same geographic area. Similarly, the Burgoyne (or Fulford) Valley extends from Fulford Harbour to Burgoyne Bay. Perhaps we should call it the Fulford-Burgoyne Valley.

Another problem with names is that they sometimes change. For example, Ford Lake (named after Frederick Foord) started as Ford’s but was changed first to Mollet’s and then to Price’s Lake before returning to its current name. Stowell Lake was first Fisher’s and then Emsley’s. Roberts Lake was once Allen’s. Blackburn Lake was first Conery’s and then Brown’s. Weston Lake was once Olsen’s and later Stewart’s. Maxwell Lake was once deMaines’. Tripp Road was once Mouat’s. And Upper Ganges Road was once Bullock’s. If you’re still following, you might like to know that Bruce Peak was once the summit of Musgrave Mountain and Baynes Peak is still the top of Mount Maxwell.

Even the names of individuals can be problematic. In the past, some people had their names changed for them—with or without their approval—perhaps because an immigration officer preferred an Anglicized name or thought that the new arrival would assimilate more easily with a simpler name. For example, Joseph King came to Salt Spring in the 1880s from Smyrna (now Izmir), Turkey, with another name, possibly Basilio (information courtesy of Jean Barman), which was changed to the straightforward King. John Stevens, the husband of King’s stepdaughter, had the original Greek name Yjanaris, according to his gravestone (information courtesy of Joan Ingram).

Sometimes our sources themselves have caused the confusion. For example, many writers have told the story of Salt Spring’s “squire,” Henry Wright Bullock whose gravestone clearly identifies the man as Harry Wright Bullock. Then there’s the relatively minor confusion when individuals change the spelling of their names—like William Patterson, who thought that his name looked better with two t’s (the English spelling) rather than the original Scottish Paterson.

 

This directory contains two lists: the first contains most but not all Salt Spring street names, since new names are continually being created for new streets; the second contains general geographical features.

Many of the geographical features around Salt Spring have been named after people or ships from the Spanish or British Navy. For example, Ganges is named after H.M.S. Ganges, the flagship (1857–60) of Rear Admiral Robert L. Baynes, whose name is remembered in Baynes Peak at the top of Mt. Maxwell. Similarly, Fulford Harbour is named after Captain John Fulford, the master of the H.M.S. Ganges, or Porlier Pass, which was named by the Spanish captain Jose M. Narvaez. Most of these names are explained in other references, most notably in British Columbia Coast Names: Their Origin and History by Captain John T. Walbran (Douglas & McIntyre, 1971), which was first published in 1909. Please try sources like Walbran for any names not included in the second list of geographical names included here.

            Readers are encouraged to send additions and corrections to the Archives website so that this directory can be continually improved and expanded.

 

Street Names

 

Most of the following names are road names on Salt Spring Island. While some names such as Arbutus Place and Wildwood Crescent are merely descriptive, most others commemorate some islander who lived nearby or developed the land. Often a developer wanted to remember someone in his or her family (e.g., Heidi Place), perhaps even a favourite pet. Sometimes the names are thematic, such as the plethora of waterbirds (e.g., Canvasback, Cormorant, Tern, Teal, Murrelet, Sandpiper, Oystercatcher) in Channel Ridge, or the maritime names in Maracaibo (e.g., Mariners Way, Fishermans Lane, Kingfisher Lane). In some cases, background information was not available; any additional information would be welcome.

 

Acheson Road
Miles and Hannah Acheson lived in a large house, which is still called Acheson House today. Acheson started a Gestetner-style newspaper called the Spotlight. Miles Acheson had been a prisoner of war of the Japanese during World War II.
Acland Road

In 1947, Bevil and Marjorie Acland opened Acland’s Resort on Baker Road in a home originally built by Ernest Crofton. The resort’s names was changed to the Booth Bay Resort in 1960, when it was bought by Thomas and Frances Portlock.

Agar Road
Named after a Major Agar who lived at the end of the road.
Akerman Road

Joseph Akerman came to Salt Spring in 1862 and farmed in the Burgoyne-Fulford Valley. His wife, Martha Clay, arrived in Victoria on a bride ship from England in 1863 and agreed to become his wife. The couple raised eight children, and many of their descendants continue to live on Salt Spring.

Alders Avenue
Captain Victor and Winifred Best lived on a property called The Alders.
Aldous Road
Aldous was an early surveyor on the island.
Amblewood Drive

descriptive name

Andrew Place
Andrew Stevens, who owned land nearby, was the son of John N. Stevens (1858–1939), who came to Salt Spring in 1885. Originally Greek (his original name was Yjanaris), Stevens was given his name on his arrival by an immigration official.
Anna Drive
Named after Anna Gossett, the wife of developer Chris Gossett
Arbutus Place
descriptive name
Arbutus Road
descriptive name
Arletta Place

 

Armand Way
Named after Joseph Armand Lucien Quesnel.
Arnell Way
Peter Arnell was a surveyor who died accidentally on Galiano Island.
Atkins Road
H. Atkins arrived in 1907. His sister married Thomas Frank Speed, and their farm stretched along Atkins Road from Rainbow Road to Lower Ganges Road.
Baker Road
Dr. Gerald Ramsay “Paddy” Baker lived on Salt Spring from 1897 to 1908 in Percy Browne’s house near Booth Canal. He left the island in 1904 for the Yukon gold fields and returned for only a brief period.
Barker’s Place
Possibly named after Jake Barker, an employee of the BC Telephone Company. Jake was a tulip grower of some note. The Barkers lived on the corner of Fulford-Ganges Road and Beddis Road. They owned the White Elephant Cafe in the 1960's .
Bayridge Place
descriptive name
Bayview Road
descriptive name
Beachside Drive

descriptive name

Beaver Point Road

The Beaver was a Hudson’s Bay Company paddle steamer used for surveying in the Strait of Georgia from 1863 to 1867. It was the first steam vessel on the west coast. It is thought that the Beaver went on the rocks at Prospect Point.

Becky Way
Becky Acheson, whose father, Chris, was involved in the subdivision.
Beddis Road
Samuel (1850–93) and Emily Beddis arrived on Salt Spring in 1884.
Belvedere Drive
Name of a farm Chris Gosset owned in Jamaica.
Benton Place

 

Betsy Lane
Named after Betty Greer (husband Tom).
Biggely Road
The name of developer Chris Gossett’s Jack Russell spaniel.
Bittancourt Road
Estalon José Bittancourt (1845–1917) and his brother Manoel Antoine Bittancourt arrived on the island in1860. This road is probably named after Manoel’s son, Abraham Reid Bittancourt, who ran a store on Ganges Hill from 1900 until it was purchased by Mouat’s in 1907.
Blackburn Road

Alan Blackburn arrived in 1907 and bought the Conery farm on Blackburn Road. In 1911, Blackburn brought the first automobile to Salt Spring.

Blain Road
Walter Blain owned a dairy farm, which he bought from the King brothers (see Kings Lane).
Bonnet Road
Named afer Laura Ruth (née Bonnet) Cudmore, long-time islander Gordon Cudmore’s wife.
Booth Road

John Patton Booth (1838–1902) arrived on Salt Spring in 1859 and farmed in this area. He was elected as a member of the BC legislature in 1871 and again in 1890, and was Speaker of the legislature at the time of his death.

Bradbury Road
Brian Bradbury from Victoria subdivided land in this area.
Bradley Road
Possibly named after developer Hart Bradley, who with Pete Frattinger was developing the Scott Point area in the mid-1960s.
Bridgman Road
Weaver Bridgman was a Victoria realtor who bought the Beaver Point property belonging to Theodore Trage in 1902.
Brinkworthy Road
descriptive name
Broadwell Road
Joel and Mary Amanda Broadwell settled on Salt Spring in 1882.
Brookwood Road

descriptive name

Bullock Creek Road
Harry Bullock moved to Salt Spring from Bristol, England, in 1892 and established a large farm estate on Upper Ganges Road. Bullock wanted people to think of him as the “squire of Salt Spring.”
Bulman Road
William Bulman bought 2,455 acres from Cusheon Lake to Cusheon Cove in 1909 and built a large sawmill at the cove.
Burgoyne Bay Road
Commander Hugh Talbot Burgoyne (1833–70) commanded the H.M.S. Ganges in 1857.
Byron Road
Jessie and Elizabeth Byron and their five sons moved to the island from Saskatchewan in 1934.
Canal Road

This road leads to Booth Canal.

Canvasback Road
descriptive name
Caprice Heights
descriptive name
Carlin Road
Howard Carlin was a school bus driver and later worked as an insurance agent from his home. Howard’s wife, Molly, was an Akerman.
Castillou Way
Henry Castillou was a BC judge who holidayed on Salt Spring. see
Castle Cross Road
From the crossroads of Castle Cross and Salt Spring Way, you have a good view of Castle (First Sister) Island. See also Channel Islands.
Cedar Lane
descriptive name
Central Avenue
Central was originally going to be the road to the prospective ferry at Long Harbour. However, when the road to the terminal was eventually built, it was decided to use the current Long Harbour route instead. This involved blasting a great deal of rock to straighten the new road.
Channel Ridge

Dr. The ridge offers views over Trincomali Channel.

Charlesworth Road
Named after Elsie (Price) and Tom Charlesworth, who died in 1918 during World War I.
Chilton Drive Name of a farm Chris Gosset's owned in Jamaica.
Chock Road
Named by logger-developer Gordon Cudmore, possibly after the wedge used by loggers.
Chu-An Drive
Indian name for Salt Spring (“facing the sea”).
Churchill Road
A.N.H. Churchill settled here. He was killed during World War I.
Clarinda Road

Named after Constance Clarinda Goodall. See also Goodall Road.

Clipper Road
descriptive name
Collins Road
John T. Collins settled on the east side of St. Mary Lake in 1895.
Corbett Road

Major Frank H. Corbett, M.C. was killed in action in World War I. His widow married Desmond Crofton.

Cormorant Crescent
descriptive name
Cottonwood Road
descriptive name
Cranberry Road
A cranberry marsh in this area was drained before 1900.
Crane Road
Possibly named after Jacob Crook Crane, a councilor with the early Municipality of Salt Spring (1872–1882).
Creekside Drive
Cusheon Creek flows here.
Crofton Road
Named after Fred Crofton who came to the island in 1898 with his brothers Frank and Ernest.
Cross Road
Cudmore Heights

Gordon Cudmore, whose family settled on Salt Spring in 1927, subdivided a large acreage off Charlesworth Road.

Cusheon Lake Road
Cusheon Place
John Ducie Cusheon came to Salt Spring in 1860, but left soon after when the government refused to let him pre-empt 1,000 acres of land.
David Crescent
David Bruce Barnes is the son of Bruce and Jean Barnes who subdivided this area. David’s sister is Leslee Quesnel.
Dean Road

Rev. George W. Dean was a Methodist minister, c. 1914.

Deer Park Road
descriptive name
Delia Crescent
Named after Annie Adelia Sandford Eyres, the grandmother of Leslee Barnes Quesnel, whose father developed the land here.
Dellcliffe Road
possibly a descriptive name
Demetri Way
Demetri Stevens is the son of Peter Stevens, the youngest son of John Stevens (1858–1939), whose original name was Yjanaris.
Desiree Drive
Desmond Crescent

Colonel Desmond Crofton, a son of Fred Crofton, served in the Canadian Scottish Regiment during World War II. For many years he helped run the Harbour House Hotel (started by his parents) and was also one of the partners of the Gulf Islands Ferry Company, which provided the island with its first ferry service.

Devine Drive
Isabella (“Bella”) Devine worked at the main counter in Mouat’s for many years.
Dodds Road
A.J.W. Dodds arrived in 1905 and taught at Central/Vesuvius School.
Dogwood Lane
Dogwood Road

descriptive name

Don Ore Road
Donore was the estate of the Barnes family. It was the first grant of land given by the English king to a family in Ireland. Bruce Barnes, who developed this area, was of Irish descent.
Douglas Road
Named after a homesteader who lived at the bottom of the road.
Dover Place
Drake Road
Arthur Drake was the butter maker at the Salt Spring creamery from 1912 to 1949.
Duck Creek Drive

This is a corruption of the original Dock Creek; a dock once existed in Dock Bay into which the creek flows.

Dukes Road

Walter and George Dukes came to the island in 1887 and 1906. They lived at the end of Dukes Road.

Dupuis Road
Alternately spelled “Depuis” and “Dupuis,” this may be a corruption of Dupuy, as Patrick and Rosamonde Dupuy have lived nearby on Mountain Road since the 1970s.
Eagle Ridge Drive
Eagles Road

descriptive name

Elizabeth Drive
Named by Mac Mouat after his wife, Elizabeth (Betty) Mouat, in the late 1960s.
Ensilwood Road
Bill Ensilwood, retired from the army, lived at the corner of Ensilwood and LePage Roads in a mobile home.
Epron Road
Named after a farmer who pre-empted land here.
Fairview Road

descriptive name

Fairway Crescent
descriptive name
Fairway Drive
descriptive name
Farm Court
descriptive name
Fer-de-Lance Road

Possibly named by someone who missed these large South American snakes.

Fernwood Road
descriptive name
Forest Hill Place
descriptive name
Forest Ridge Road
descriptive name
Fort Street
Perhaps named for the Hudson’s Bay Company fort in Victoria by the developers of this area (Grantville) in 1891, who included Victoria Mayor John Grant and Captain Edward Walker.
Fraser Road
The family name of Lotus Ruckle. Her brother Donald Fraser developed this area. The family of five children came to the island in 1921 with their mother, Frances Imogene Fraser Menhinick, and her husband, John Cory Menhinick.
Frazier Road George Quesnel and Peter Thompson subdivided land here. Their company name was Frazier Farm.
Fred Road

Named after Fred Howard, who made the subdivision in the Cranberry, Fred Road leads to Roberts Lake. The naming was arranged by Phillip S. Swift, O.L.S., B.C.L.S. He says it's a road you can get to know on a first name basis.

Fruitvale Road Fruit Vale was the name of W. E. Scott’s estate and orchard, one of the island’s largest producers of fruit. See also Scott Point Drive.
Fulford-Ganges Rd. descriptive name
Furness Road George ( –1898) and Kate (1849–1932) Furness settled in this area in 1880.
Garner Road

Lona and Oland Garner settled in this area in 1905. Their son Joe is well known on the island for his autobiographical books about Salt Spring and logging.

Geigrich Road H. C. Giegerich was chair of the Lady Minto Gulf Islands Hospital Board in 1959. Despite the spelling difference, the road is likely named after him.
Goodall Road Raymond and Constance Goodall bought the property here in 1958. The road was put in about 1970 when Ray subdivided some lots.
Goodrich Road Clarence Albert “Jock” and Phyllis Goodrich arrived on Salt Spring in 1919. Their daughter Ruth married George Heinekey and the property at the end of the road is still owned by the family.
Graham Drive Graham was the name of Daphne Bradley’s first husband, who was killed in World War II. Daphne’s husband, Hart, developed many pieces of land on Salt Spring.
Gransview Place

descriptive name

Grantville Road

This was the name of the ambitious 1891 development by Edward Mallandaine, Captain John Walker, and others. The developers hoped that it would become the commercial centre of Salt Spring, but it failed to attract buyers.

Hamilton-Norne Rd.

Lyle Hamilton-Horne and his family lived here in the 1980s.

Hammond Road  
Harbourside Place descriptive name
Harrison Avenue Chuck Harrison settled on Salt Spring in 1959; his land was developed after he sold it.
Head Road descriptive name
Hedger Road Arthur and Amy Hedger, originally from England, came to Salt Spring with their five children in 1922 and used a Soldier Settlement grant to buy the old Whims farm at the end of present-day Hedger Road.
Heidi Place

Named after Norman Twa’s daughter.

Hereford Avenue Named after the English county.
High Hill Road descriptive name
Highwood Place descriptive name
Hillcrest Drive descriptive name
Hillgrove Road The middle name of Chris Gosset's two sons.
Hilltop Road descriptive name
Hillview Place descriptive name
Holmes Road

Marc and Jean Holmes settled on a large property at the bottom of Holmes Road (off Isabella Point Road) in the early 1960s. They planted an orchard, specializing in peaches. obit

Hope Hill Road This private road leads into a large estate. The name has nothing to do with Hope Hill located east of here.
Horel Road Charles Horel came to the island in 1878. He was a devout Methodist and had a reputation as a fire-and-brimstone lay preacher. His grandson Chuck Horel was trained as a journalist, but worked in logging and later, as a realtor, developed many areas of the island.
Howard Road Probably named after Howard Byron who had a small development in this area.
Howell Lane Named after Howard and Ellen Byron.
Humphreys Hill Rd. Gilbert Humphreys developed land here.

Isabella Point Rd.

Isabella was a daughter of the captain of one of the British survey ships in the late-1800s.
Isle View Drive Descriptive name. The view of the islands in Ganges Harbour is very fine from here.
Jacalan Drive  
Jackson Avenue Probably named after later arrival Vic Jackson.
Jasper Road

 

Jenkins Road Named after Don and Hattie Jenkins.
Jennifer Way Named after developer Larry Bader’s daughter.
Jones Road According to Bob Akerman, a logger named Jones had a farm at the end of the road in the 1950s. Earlier the road was known as Bird Road after a family who lived here.
Juniper Place descriptive name
Kanaka Road The Kanakas were people of Hawaiian descent who came to Salt Spring in the late-nineteenth century.
Kangro Court

 

 

Kilner Road  
King Road Named after the King family, either Joseph King, who arrived in the 1880s, or Joseph’s nephew Leon King.
Kings Lane The King brothers (Colin and Ronald) had a dairy farm on the land here in the 1930s. The farm was later sold to Walter Blain.
Kitchen Road Wilfrid Kitchen settled here with his wife, a granddaughter of Theodore Trage, in the early 1900s.
Kitchener Road Perhaps a tribute to the renowned English aristocratic family.
Knott Road Simon Knott, a lawyer, developed the land here.
Lakefair Crescent

descriptive name

Lakeview Drive descriptive name
Langley Road Named after A. A. Langley who lived here in the early 1900s. Mrs. Langley was a member of the Guild of Sunshine, which was highly involved in establishing and funding the Lady Minto Gulf Islands Hospital in 1914. Mr. Langley served on the hospital’s board of administration.
Lang's Road John Charles Lang arrived on Salt Spring in 1910 and bought the Fernwood Farm, which then extended to Lang’s Road.
Last Road descriptive name
Lautman Drive

Joe Lautman was a logger and the second husband of Winnie Horel Lautman Watmough.

Lawn Hill Drive descriptive name
Layard Road Colonel Brownlow Villiers Layard arrived on Salt Spring in 1906. He followed his sons Cam and Togie Layard, whom he’d sent out to buy land for the family. Brownlow’s wife, Clara, was president of the Sunshine Guild, which worked to establish the Lady Minto Gulf Islands Hospital.
Lee Ann Road  
Lee Road Hudson Tom Lee arrived on the island in 1891.
Leisure Lane descriptive name
LePage Road

Theodore LePage moved from the Island of Guernsey and pre-empted 160 acres on Salt Spring in the 1870s or 1880s.

Leslee Drive Named after Leslee Joy Barnes Quesnel. Leslee’s father, Bruce George Barnes, subdivided land in this area.
Liberty Hall Lane Named by Tom Toynbee after the log house of the same name owned by his uncles Charles and Bert Toynbee near Toynbee Road. They named their log house Liberty Hall because they thought they’d reached “the promised land.”
Lionel Crescent Named after Lionel Beddis, a son of Samuel Beddis (See Beddis Road). Lionel was a fiddlemaker.
Little Mountain Rd. descriptive name
Long Harbour Road

descriptive name

Lord Mike's Road My father was Chuck Horel and my brother is Michael Horel. I recall the building of Lord Mike's Road. 
The first of the two stores is correct. My father like to tell this story. During the road construction, several unanticipated challenges arose that made construction more difficult and at one point, in a fit of exasperation Dad said "Lord, Mike, we'll never get it built!" When it was finally finished, he called it Lord Mike's Road.
There was another instance in a completely different place when my father was negotiating a right of way with another land owner. They did not come to agreement, their discussions ended amicably, and they remained friends. But those discussions had nothing to do with Lord Mike's road.
Glynnis Horel
Lower Ganges Road descriptive name
Lumley Road named after the Lumley family, Hawaiian settlers
McAllister Road  
McGill Road Henry J. McGill ran a large bakery in Ganges for twenty-one years starting in 1939.
McGoldrick Place Andy McGoldrick developed this land in the 1980s.
McLennan Drive Elizabeth and Alexander McLennan settled on Salt Spring in 1882.
McPhillips Avenue

A resident of Victoria, Albert Edward McPhillips represented the Gulf Islands in the provincial legislature from 1907 to 1913.

Madrona Road The American name for the arbutus tree.
Main Street descriptive name
Maliview Drive Descriptive name for the view over Trincomali Channel.
Malladine Street Edward Mallandaine came to Salt Spring in 1859 and claimed land in the Walker Hook area.
Mansell Road Thomas and Priscilla Mansell came to the island in 1884.
Manson Road Manson was the maiden name of Jane Mouat. The name reappears often in the Mouat clan (e.g., Manson Toynbee).
Maple Ridge Road descriptive name
Maracaibo Lane

According to Charles and Sally Bazzard (The Magic of Maracaibo, p. 49), this strata development was named after Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela, a freshwater lake connected by a river to the sea. The Long Harbour lagoon reminded the Moats, one of the families who started Maracaibo of this lake.

Margaret Avenue Margaret Richardson was the wife of Ed Richardson who developed the subdivision here.
Margoline Drive Stewart Margolin, a Canadian actor, lived on this street for many years.
Mariko Place  
Marina Crescent descriptive name
Mariners Lane descriptive name
Maxam Road

John Maxam subdivided land here in the 1980s. Maxam never lived on Salt Spring.

Maycock Road  
Meadow Drive descriptive name
Meadow Lane descriptive name
Menhinick Drive Cory Menhinick; his wife, Frances Imogene Fraser Menhinick; and her five children settled in this area in 1921. Cory was Lotus Fraser Ruckle’s stepfather.
Mereside Road Named by John Carter Mollet after his English home. Mollet and his family settled on land on Ford Lake in 1887. Later they moved to the Fulford-Ganges Road where Mollet was well known for his amazing garden.
Merganser Place descriptive name
Meyer Road

A Victoria lawyer who developed land on this road.

Miles Avenue Named after Geoffrey Miles Beddis, a son of Samuel Beddis (See Beddis Road).
Mobrae Avenue Short for Mouat-Bradley, Mac Mouat, his brothers, and Hart Bradley developed the land here.
Monteith Drive Monteith was the maiden name of Margaret Richardson, the wife of Ed Richardson who developed the subdivision here.
Morningside Drive descriptive name
Mountain Road descriptive name
Mountain Park Dr. descriptive name
Mountain View Rd. descriptive name
Mount Baker Cres.

Joseph Baker, R.N. was third lieutenant of the Discovery, a ship commanded by George Vancouver in 1792. Residents of this street have a view of Mount Baker in Washington State.

Mount Belcher Hts. Captain Sir Edward Belcher (1799–1877) was a British surveying officer and Arctic explorer.
Mount Erskine Rd. Mount Erskine as well as Erskine Pt. just below it were possibly named for James A. Erskine, an admiral in the Royal Navy. Erskine was born in 1838, became a sub-lieutenant in 1858, a lieutenant and then a commander in 1862, and later a full admiral. Alternatively, the road and point may have been named by Captain Richards in 1863 after Admiral Elphinstone Erskine, Commander-in-Chief of the North American Squadron.
Mount Maxwell Rd.

John Maxwell settled at the head of Burgoyne Bay in 1860. Maxwell and his partner, James Lunney, eventually developed a 1,000-acre ranch specializing in Texas longhorns. They also donated land for a wharf in Burgoyne Bay. The Maxwells ran the local post office from 1883 to 1900.

 

Mount Tuam Road “Chuan” is a Cowichan word meaning “facing the sea.” Over time, “Chuan” became “Tuan” and eventually “Tuam.”
Murrelet Place descriptive name
Musgrave Road Edward Musgrave, the fourth son of an Irish aristocrat, bought a 7,000-acre farm from the Pimbury brothers in 1885. Musgrave sold to Clive and Edward Trench only seven years later.
Natalie Lane

Named by logger, writer, and developer-realtor Chuck Horel after his wife Natalie Jameski Horel.

Nobbs Road Harry Nobbs, his wife, and children; Frieda and Charles Nobbs and their five children; and Fred Nobbs, his wife, and four children moved to the Cranberry in 1904.
North Beach Road descriptive name
Northeast Road descriptive name
North End Road descriptive name
North View Road descriptive name
Norton Road

Portuguese-born John Norton and his brother Delarvo settled on Salt Spring around 1860.

Nose Point Road Perhaps named for the shape of the point.
Oakspring Road descriptive name
Old Divide Road Descriptive name identifying the rugged, hilly division between the north and south ends of island.
Old Scott Road The Scott Brothers (William E., Geoffrey, Frank, and Harold) arrived c. 1880. W. E. Scott established one of the island’s largest orchards at his estate called Fruit Vale off Long Harbour Road. He became Deputy Minister of Agriculture for British Columbia from 1910 to 1916. Brother Frank Scott sold just enough land to build Mahon Hall to the Islands Agricultural and Fruit Growers Association in 1900. (The price was $40.)
Old Smith Road See Smith Road.
Ontario Place Presumably named after the Province of Ontario.
Orchard Avenue descriptive name
Ouelette Road

 

Oystercatch Place descriptive name
Pallot Way Dave Pallot lived on the corner of Pallot and Rainbow Roads.
Park Drive descriptive name
Parminter Road Rev. Henry Parminter was the chaplain on the H.M.S. Ganges. He died in 1899.
Pattella Way Named after the Pattella family in the early 1980s.
Patterson Road Named after the Patterson family of Beaver Point and Fulford. William and Emily Patterson came to Salt Spring in the early 1900s. William was Polly Ruckle’s brother. (Polly was the wife of Daniel Henry Ruckle.) This road is also known as Tahouney, the name of a Hawaiian family who moved to Salt Spring in the late-1800s.
Perdue Road  
Peregrine Way descriptive name
Peter Arnell Park

Peter Arnell was a surveyor who died accidentally on Galiano Island

Pine Place

descriptive name

Portlock Park Thomas and Frances Portlock bought the Booth Bay Resort in 1961. Thomas was the president of the Lions Club when it bought 10 acres in 1974 to develop Portlock Park.
Price Road Patley Lloyd Augustus Price arrived on the island in 1909 and bought John Mollet’s Mereside property.
Primrose Lane descriptive name
Pringle Farm Road This subdivision was put in by the Pringle family, whose farm is adjacent to the development.
Purdy Road

Raffles Purdy, the brother of Emily Beddis, arrived on the island with the Beddises in 1884. He eventually built his own home on Beddis Road near Rourke Road.

Purvis Road In 1904, Percy Purvis and his partner Joe Malcolm opened a general store in Ganges that was eventually bought by Gilbert Mouat and his mother, Jane, in 1907. This store is now over 100 years old. Malcolm and Purvis came to Salt Spring in 1889.
Quail Crescent descriptive name
Quarry Drive Named for Estalon Bittancourt’s stone quarry north of Booth Bay, which opened in 1886. Sandstone from here reputedly went into the Esquimalt graving dock, the seawall of Victoria’s Inner Harbour, and the San Francisco mint.
Quebec Drive

Named after the Province of Quebec.

Quebec Lane Named after the Province of Quebec.
Rainbow Road When the road was surveyed (1910–11), the H.M.C.S. Rainbow was docked at the wharf, so the surveyor, a man named Gillespie, named the road after the vessel.
Reginald Hill Road  
Reid Road  
Reynolds Road Frank and Pearl Reynolds settled on Salt Spring in 1911.
Richard Flack Road Named by Dunbar Developments (two brothers).
Robinson Road Henry William Robinson came to the island in 1885.
Roland Road Peter George Roland was the second husband of Matilda Naukana Harris of Hawaiian heritage.
Ross Road

Fred Ross worked in men’s clothing at Mouat’s in the 1950s.

Rourke Road  
Russell Road Named after Jack and Migs Russell, who, together with Mary and Charles Moat, developed the strata subdivision called Maracaibo.
Salt Spring Way This one is obvious, if uninspired.
Saltair Lane descriptive name
Samson Road Henry Sampson (1830–1919) arrived 1859, pre-empted property in the Fernwood area, and became the island’s first constable.
Samuel Crescent Named after Lionel Beddis’s son Samuel Beddis, who died during World War II. See also Lionel Crescent and Beddis Road.
Sandpiper Place

descriptive name

Sarah Way Named after developer Bob Adair’s daughter.
Scarff Lane Named after Gordon Scarff, who developed land here.

Scott Point Drive

Scott Road

Scott Point was named after William Ernest Scott, member of the Provincial Board of Horticulture and justice of the peace, by Captain John F. Parry, master of the H.M.S. Egeria, on resurveying Ganges Harbour in 1905. The Scott Brothers (W. E., Geoffrey, Frank, and Harold) settled on Salt Spring about 1880. W. E. Scott established one of the island’s largest orchards at his estate called Fruit Vale off Long Harbour Road. He became Deputy Minister of Agriculture for British Columbia from 1910 to 1916. His brother Frank Scott sold just enough land to build Mahon Hall to the Islands Agricultural and Fruit Growers Association in 1900. (The price was $40.)
Scotton Place

Bill and Marie Scotton came to the island in the late 1960s. Bill Scotton was a logger who developed land here.

Seabright Road descriptive name
Seaview Avenue descriptive name
Seymour Heights Possibly name after the Seymour family.
Sharp Road  
Shepherd Hills Rd. Named by John Stepaniuk.
Simson Road Margaret and Harry Simson came to Salt Spring from Saturna Island in 1927 and purchased the 157-acre Roberts farm at Stonecutters Bay.
Singer Road Possibly named after F. M. Singer who ran portable sawmills on Salt Spring in the early 1900s.
Sir Echo’s Way Sir Echo was Norman Mouat’s favourite horse.
Sky Valley Road

descriptive name

Smith Road Frank, Arnold, and Walter Smith, arrived c. 1919 and settled near Musgrave Landing. Arnold Smith’s 160-acre property is now the Mill Farm Park Reserve. His brothers pre-empted adjoining properties.
Solitt Road Wayne and Yvonne Solitt moved to Salt Spring from Alberta.
South Road descriptive name
South Bank Drive descriptive name
Southey Point Road James Lowther Southey, R.N. was secretary to Rear Admiral Sir R. L. Baynes whose flagship was the H.M.S. Ganges and who was in Georgia Strait from 1857 to 1860.
South Ridge Road descriptive name
Stark Road Sylvia and Louis Stark settled on Salt Spring in 1860.
Stevens Road John Stevens, whose real name was Yjanaris, was the husband of Emma King. Stevens was probably given his name by an immigration officer who found Yjanaris too difficult to pronounce
Stewart Road

Bill and Winnifred Stewart lived here in the 1930s.

Stonecutter Way Named to commemorate the stonecutters who worked in the Vesuvius quarries.
Suffolk Road Named after the English county.
Sun Eagle Drive descriptive name
Sunnyside Drive descriptive name
Sunset Drive descriptive name (This road faces west and would be a great place to watch sunsets.)
Swan Point Road descriptive name
Swanson Road Bill Swanson developed this area in the 1950s.
Tahouney Road

The Tahouney family were Kanakas or Hawaiians who settled on Isabella Point Road. They are descended from William Nawana, who settled on Salt Spring in 1874.

Tantramar Drive Named after the Tantramar Marsh in New Brunswick by Emily Smith who developed the area.
Teal Place descriptive name
Terminus Street The name of this road and its proximity to the ferry terminal suggest that at some time it was considered to be the access road to the terminal.
Tern Road descriptive name
Thomas Road  
Toynbee Road Named after Charlie and Bert Toynbee whose log house was at the end of the road.
Trincomali Heights

Named after H.M.S. Trincomalee, a British sailing frigate stationed in the Pacific from 1853 to 1956.

Tripp Road H. W. Tripp pre-empted land on the road that bears his name in about 1902.
Twinflower Lane descriptive name
Uplands Road descriptive name
Upper Ganges Road descriptive name
Valhalla Road descriptive name
Vesuvius Bay Road

Vesuvius Bay was named for the paddle sloop H.M. Vesuvius by Captain George Henry Richards in 1859.

Victoria Street Named for the city of Victoria. See Fort Street.
Village Terrace This small development sits on a terrace overlooking the village of Ganges.
Walker's Hook Road Captain Edward Walker pre-empted land here in 1859. Walker was the master of a schooner that plied the waters between Victoria and Nanaimo. He was also involved in the abortive attempt to establish a community at Grantville.
Webster Drive Named after Gerard “Jordi” Webster.
Welbury Point Drive Welbury Point was named after Welbury House, Bradford, Yorkshire, the residence of William E. Scott. It was named by Captain John F. Parry of the H.M.S. Egeria in 1905.
West Eagle Drive descriptive name
Westcott Road

Frank Westcott, a nephew of Ann and Henry Stevens (proprietors of Stevens’s Boarding House), came to the island in 1903.

Weston View Road descriptive name (There is a view of Weston Lake—named after William Weston who came to the island about 1870—here.)
Whims Road Hiram Whims established an upland farm on the ridge between Fernwood and St. Mary Lake in 1859.
Wildwood Crescent descriptive name
Wildwood Drive descriptive name
William Street  
Wilkie Way Dr. Theodore F. Wilkie lived here and developed the land on this street.
Winteringham Rd. Winteringham was a teacher on the island before World War II.
Woodhall Place

 

Woodland Drive descriptive name
Wright Road Probably named after Abraham Secord Wright, who settled in the Cranberry in 1903.
Zabel Road name for a public road access
Zalit Road name for a public road access
Zander Road name for a public road access
   

General Geographical Features

Beaver Point

The Beaver was a Hudson’s Bay Company paddle steamer used for surveying in the Strait of Georgia (named the Gulf of Georgia by Captain George Vancouver in 1792 and changed to Strait by Captain Richards in 1865).

Beddis Beach Emily and Samuel Beddis landed on the island in 1884.
Blackburn Lake Alan Blackburn arrived on Salt Spring in 1907. An earlier name for this lake was Conery’s Lake.
Bold Bluff Point descriptive name
Booth Canal John Patton Booth (1838–1902) arrived on Salt Spring in 1859 and farmed in this area. He was elected a member of the BC legislature in 1871 and again in 1890, and was Speaker of the legislature at the time of his death.
Bruce Peak

See Mount Bruce.

Bullock Lake Harry Bullock moved to Salt Spring from Bristol, England, in 1892 and established a large farm estate on Upper Ganges Road. Bullock wanted people to think of him as the “squire of Salt Spring.”
Burgoyne Bay Commander Hugh Talbot Burgoyne, V.C. was the commander of the H.M.S. Ganges from 1857 to 1860.
Cape Keppel Named in 1859 after Rear Admiral Sir Henry Keppel (1809–1904), known as the “Father of the British Navy.”
Captain Passage Named after Captain John Fulford, the master of the flagship H.M.S. Ganges.
Castle Island See Channel Islands.
Central

Central Settlement was one of the first areas of Salt Spring to be settled.

Chain Islands Descriptive name: the “chain” of islands in Ganges Harbour.
Channel Islands The islands in Ganges Harbour, including Goat Island (at one time owned by Louis Stark who grazed his goats here), Deadman’s Island (used by aboriginal people as a burial ground), and the three Sister Islands. First Sister Island has been locally referred to as Castle Island because of the castle-like house built on it by James Dun Halley who settled on Salt Spring in 1905. The house never worked out and so became known as “Halley’s folly.” The white-shell beach on Third Sister Island is known locally as Chocolate Beach ostensibly because chocolate lilies used to bloom here in the spring.
Cusheon Creek Named after John Ducie Cusheon, who arrived in 1860 and left the same year.
Cusheon Lake

See Cusheon Creek.

Dock Point There was once a dock here.
Drummond Park In 1971, Captain Leopold “Jock” and Betty Drummond donated the land here for a children’s playground.
Duck Bay A corruption of Dock Bay. See Dock Point.
Duck Creek A corruption of Dock Bay. See Dock Point.
Eleanor Point Eleanor was a daughter of the captain of one of the British survey ships in the late-1800s. See also Isabella Point.
Fernwood Point descriptive name
Fernwood descriptive name
Ford Lake Frederick Foord settled on Salt Spring in 1864.
Fulford Harbour Named after Captain John Fulford of the H.M.S. Ganges, which sailed in the Stait of Georgia from 1857 to 1860.
Ganges Harbour

The H.M.S. Ganges (a sailing battleship) was the flagship of Rear Admiral Robert L. Baynes.

Grace Point  
Hope Hill Vice-admiral Sir James Hope was commander-in-chief of North America and the West Indies Station from 1864 to 1867. His flagship was the Duncan.
Houstoun Passage Captain Wallace Houstoun was the master of the H.M.S. Trincomalee in the Strait of Georgia from 1853 to 1856.
Hudson Point  
Idol Island  
Isabella Point

Isabella was a daughter of the captain of one of the British survey ships in the late-1800s. See also Eleanor Point.

Kuper Island Captain Augustus Leopold Kuper was the master of the H.M.S. Thetis, which was in the Strait of Georgia from 1851 to 1853.
Little Lake descriptive name (Also known as Rosemurgie Lake)
Long Harbour descriptive name
Maxwell Creek John Maxwell settled at the head of Burgoyne Bay in 1860. Maxwell and his partner, James Lunney, eventually developed a 1,000-acre ranch specializing in Texas longhorns. They also donated land for a wharf in Burgoyne Bay. The Maxwells ran the local post office from 1883 to 1900.
Maxwell Lake

See Maxwell Creek

Maxwell Point See Maxwell Creek.
Mouat Park Thomas and Jane Mouat settled on Tripp Road in 1885. The parkland was donated and named by one of their sons, Gavin Mouat.
Mount Bruce Named after Rear Admiral Henry William Bruce, commander in chief of the British navy’s Pacific station and the flagship Monarch from 1854 to 1857.
Mount Maxwell Park John Maxwell established a farm of Texas longhorns in Burgoyne Bay in 1860.
Musgrave Landing Edward Musgrave, the fourth son of an Irish aristocrat, bought a 7,000-acre farm from the Pimbury brothers in 1885. Musgrave sold to Clive and Edward Trench only seven years later.
Nose Point

Perhaps named for the shape of the point.

Parminter Point Rev. Henry Parminter was the chaplain on the H.M.S. Ganges. He died in 1899.
Pender Islands Daniel Pender was the master of H.M. Plumper, surveying vessel in Georgia Strait from 1857 to 1861.
Portlock Park Thomas and Frances Portlock bought the Booth Bay Resort in 1961. Thomas was the president of the Lions Club when it bought 10 acres in 1974 to develop Portlock Park.
Prevost Island Captain James Charles Prevost was the master of the H.M.S. Satellite, which was in the Pacific Station from 1857 to 1860.
Roberts Lake Possibly named after early settler Richard Percy Elliott Roberts.
Rosemurgie Lake

After the Rosemurgie family who used water from the lake to run a sawmill. Also known as Little Lake.

Ruckle Provincial Park Henry Ruckle moved to Salt Spring in 1872 and gradually established a 1200-acre farm. Grandson Gordon Ruckle sold the land to the provincial government 100 years later, and it became a provincial park in 1975.
Russell Island  
St. Mary Lake Possibly named by Estalon Jose Bittancourt, a devout Roman Catholic.
Sansum Narrows Arthur Sansum, R.N. was a 1st lieutenant on the H.M.S. Thetis, which sailed in the Strait of Georgia from 1851 to 1853.
Satellite Channel Named after H.M. screw corvette Satellite, which sailed in the Strait of Georgia from 1857 to 1860.
Sharp Road Mr. Sharp
Scott Point

Scott Point was named after William Ernest Scott, member of the Provincial Board of Horticulture and justice of the peace, by Captain John F. Parry, master of the H.M.S. Egeria, on resurveying Ganges Harbour in 1905. See also Scott Point Drive above.

Southey Point Southey Point James Lowther Southey, R.N. was secretary to Rear Admiral Sir R. L. Baynes whose flagship was the H.M.S. Ganges and who was in Georgia Strait from 1857 to 1860.
Stonecutters Bay Named after stonecutters who worked in the quarries along this side of the island.
Stowell Lake Named after an early settler named Stowe; two l’s were added erroneously as a result of the map abbreviation for “Lake.”
Stuart Channel Captain Charles Edward Stuart (1817–63) was a Hudson’s Bay Company officer.
Swanson Channel John Swanson (1827–72) was the master of the Beaver for the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1858 and the Otter in 1866.
Thetis Island

The H.M.S. Thetis sailed in Georgia Strait from 1851 to 1853.

Trincomali Channel The H.M.S. Trincomalee was a sailing frigate in the Pacific Station from 1853 to 1856.
Vesuvius Bay The H.M. Vesuvius was a paddle sloop. The bay was named by Captain George Henry Richards in 1859.
Walker Hook Captain Edward Walker pre-empted land here in 1859. Walker was the master of a schooner that plied the waters between Victoria and Nanaimo. He was also involved in the abortive attempt to establish a community at Grantville.
Wallace Island Named after Captain Wallace Houston of the H.M.S. Trincomalee. (The original name of the island was Narrow Island.)
Welbury Bay Named after Welbury House, Bradford, Yorkshire, the residence of William E. Scott, by Captain John F. Parry of the H.M.S. Egeria in 1905.
Weston Lake Named after William Weston who came to the island about 1870.
Winteringham Road

David and Marcella Winteringham arrived on Salt Spring Island in the Spring of 1948. David ran a fishing camp for small mouth bass on St. Mary's Lake. He died there in April of 1952. Their son Bud left the Island to teach in Vancouver. Marcella left in approximately 1960.

Yeo Point Gerald Yeo, M.D. was a surgeon on the H.M.S. Ganges from 1857 to 1860.